jeannepompadour:

Book of Hours of Marguerite d’Orléans, western France, c. 1430

design-is-fine:

Malcolm English, artwork for Carnaby Street by Tom Salter, 1970. Via  Sweet Jane

damsellover:

Phyllis Stanley in The Next of Kin (1942)

damsellover:

Phyllis Stanley in The Next of Kin (1942)


Athanasius Kircher, Sphinx Mystagoga, 17th century

Athanasius Kircher, Sphinx Mystagoga, 17th century

(Source: deathandmysticism)


'Aequabunt viribus ausus'
Thesis plate with Pallas Athena in armour riding on a chariot drawn by two lions, while an eagle rises to Jupiter above. Engraver unknown. 1660s.

'Aequabunt viribus ausus'

Thesis plate with Pallas Athena in armour riding on a chariot drawn by two lions, while an eagle rises to Jupiter above. Engraver unknown. 1660s.

(Source: britishmuseum.org)

ART HISTORY MEME || [9/9] paintings: The Coronation of Napoleon by Jacques-Louis David (1807) +

design-is-fine:

Piet Mondrian, Tableau No. 1, 1922/25. Oil on canvas. Photo Robert Bayer. Via fondationbeyeler.ch

design-is-fine:

Piet Mondrian, Tableau No. 1, 1922/25. Oil on canvas. Photo Robert Bayer. Via fondationbeyeler.ch

rudygodinez:

Oskar Schlemmer’s contribution of a mural as part of the redecoration of the Jugendstil premises in the spirit of the Bauhaus, (1923)

Schlemmer chose the worksop wing as the location for his mural contribution for the Bauhaus exhibition of 1923, where he combined painting and sculpture in “colored mortar reliefs”. These were executed by master craftsman Josef Hartwig and a number of students. In these murals, Schlemmer played with the contrasts of standing/lying, male/female and man/architecture.

aide-factory:

Breathtaking The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings illustration by Jian Guo also known as breathing2004

lindahall:

Johannes Regiomontanus - Scientist of the Day

Johannes Regiomontanus, a German astronomer, was born June 6, 1436. Regiomontanus is often considered to be the greatest astronomer in the long interval between Ptolemy of Alexandria, who worked in the 2nd-century C.E., and the 16th-century Copernicus.  Regiomontanus is on the right in the portrait pair above; Ptolemy is at the left.  Today we take notice of Regiomontanus’s attempt to become the world’s first publisher of scientific books. Gutenberg’s Bible, you will recall, was completed around 1455, and Regiomontanus saw the potential of the printing press for addressing one of the greatest problems facing an astronomer or mathematician who was trying to read ancient sources: copying errors in manuscripts.

Consequently, in 1471, Regiomontanus moved to Nuremberg in southern Germany and set up his own printing press. One of the first things he printed was a single-page list of all the books he was going to print, and it is a heady list indeed, including Ptolemy’s Almagest, Euclid’s Elements, the complete works of Archimedes, as well as some modern works, such as the New Theory of the Planets by his teacher and colleague, Georg Peurbach. Regiomontanus did print the Peurbach treatise, and an almanac, and a few other books, but he was called to Rome in 1476 to consult on the problem of the Church calendar, and there he died, under mysterious circumstances, at the age of 40. As a result, his ambitious publishing program went unfulfilled, and as an indication of what Regiomontanus’s early death cost the course of Renaissance science, we will only note that Ptolemy’s Almagest was not published until 1515, and this edition, utilizing a medieval Latin translation, was far inferior to the translation that Regiomontanus himself had made from the Greek.

 We do not have in our Library any of the books that Regiomontanus printed between 1471 and 1475; they are extremely scarce, and very expensive. But we do have a fine copy of his Epitome of the Almagest, published after his death in 1496. The detail portrait pair above is taken from the handsome woodcut frontispiece to the Epitomewhich you can see in its entirely directly below the detail.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City